lean-to shelter
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Wilderness Survival Shelter - Lean-to

How to build a lean-to





Ambient temperature midday 52 (°F), nighttime 28 (°F)

Weather: scattered showers - wind gusts up to 30 MPH



lean to shelter


The lean-to shelter is one of the most popular shelters in any survival documentation. It is an uncomplicated shelter to build and if you have a tarp, mylar blanket (emergency blanket) or poncho, it should only take a few minutes. Whether making more permanent wooden lean-to or a quick emergency shelter, the lean-to will protect you from environmental threats. One of the reasons a lean-to is so popular is you can build a it out of almost anything. Materials such as trash bags, tarp, poncho or plastic sheet can be used to water proof the shelter. In the following link we discuss building shelters using tarps, ponchos, and emergency blankets.

Poncho and Tarp Shelters

poncho shelters
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For this article we decided to build a lean-to using debris shelter techniques. The location of this shelter was less than perfect. We chose this location making sure there were no branches above that could crash down in the middle of the night. With wind gusts up to 30 MPH, several trees were damaged in the area already. Our goal was to get out of the wind and the scattered showers.

A lean-to can be constructed quicker if a natural structure is used as a wall. For instance this fallen tree could help conserve build time.



lean to shelter



We did not want to use any man made materials for the lean-to build so we used this vine as cordage.


natural cordage






First step to build the lean-to is to fasten what I can the "backbone" of the shelter. The backbone will hold all the weight of the other branches and the debris. Its a good idea to test it before going further. If it is snowing, keep in mind the added weight of the snow. We would hate to spend hours building the shelter just to see it collapse.


lean to shelter



Keeping in mind that we want to sit under the shelter, we add branches at about a 45° angle. Note: The angle is usually going to have to be different when using material such as spruce boughs for roofing. This will help limit leaking. Sometimes it makes sense to build it with a steeper angle so it sheds rain or snow.


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Add branches closely together. This keeps the debris from falling through.


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Thinking it may rain again, we began to add the debris before the shelter was finished. If possible either wear gloves or construct a rake out of a branch with several forks. Keep in mind that bugs and snakes like to hide under the debris.


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Adding small branches on top of the debris will keep the leaves from being blown away.


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lean to shelter

Complete Lean to shelter



Preferably, we like to cover the sides of the lean-to. This will minimize the wind draft. Here we add smaller branches (ribs) to the sides of the shelter.


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Once the shelter is finished, we started a fire. Surrounding the fire with rocks not only protects from the wind but we can later use the hot stones for warmth. The radiative heat should help to keep you warm and hopefully dry the leaves inside the shelter.


lean to shelter



We can modify the shelter in different ways to make it warmer and adding more debris to the top is always a good idea.


lean to shelter



To help keep us warm, we built a fire-wall to help reflect the heat and block the wind. Using a reflective material such as mylar from an emergency blanket would further increase warmth from radiation.

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So there it is, the lean-to shelter. Not the warmest shelter, but it can be built quickly and could possibly save your life. Keeping yourself dry can make all the difference in the world.

Keep in mind that a lean-to shelters can be built quickly using a poncho or tarp.

Here we quickly put together a lean-to out of a survival blanket. A quick emergency shelter like this one could help us to block wind, radiative heat and precipitation. The same shelter can be built using a tarp. Tarp shelters are covered in the articles below. Using a tarp to make a shelter will usually be more durable. Tarps are less likely to tear and have built in grommets for tying purposes.






Please see our other shelter articles for examples on the a-frame shelter, poncho shelter and tarp shelters.


Shelter

survival shelters
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Double Lean-to (A-frame shelter)

a-frame shelter
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Poncho and Tarp Shelters


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Jungle A-frame Shelter


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